American Indian


Heritage Day in Texas

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Texas Legislature History

HB 174 became Law / 05/10/2013

THE 2013 TEXAS LEGISLATURE PASSED A LAW THAT THE LAST FRIDAY IN SEPTEMBER BE DESIGNATED AS AMERICAN INDIAN HERITAGE DAY IN TEXAS IN RECOGNITION OF THE HISTORICAL, CULTURAL, AND SOCIAL CONTRIBUTIONS AMERICAN INDIAN COMMUNITIES AND LEADERS MADE.
Signed by Gov. Perry, Friday, May 10 / HB 174 Makes Friday, Sept. 27, 2013 first American Indian Heritage Day in Texas

The first official American Indian Heritage Day in Texas is Friday, September 27, 2013, thanks to legislation authored by Texas State Representative Roberto R. Alonzo of Dallas. House Bill 174, which was signed by Governor Rick Perry on Friday, May 10, 2013, creates American Indian Heritage Day in Texas, in recognition of the many historical, cultural, and social contributions our American Indian communities and leaders have made to this great state of ours.

“I am proud to recognize the American Indians who are the truly native citizens to this great country of the United States. The many historical, cultural, and social contributions our American Indian citizens have made specifically to the great state of Texas have enriched our state tremendously. Similar to the other great holidays we celebrate for Hispanic, African-American, Asian, and Jewish communities it is only fitting to recognize American Indians. After all, our success as a nation has been in large part due to the unique melting pot environment of the American people,” said Rep. Alonzo.

The latest Census data figures indicate that Texas ranks fourth among states with a large Indian population. In Texas, however, that population is still an invisible population. In fact, most citizens of Texas are not even aware of the existence of approximately 120 tribes (represented by its citizens), three federally-recognized Indian tribes, one state recognized tribe, eight federally-funded Indian Education programs in the state, one Urban Inter-Tribal Center of Texas and the American Indian Chamber of Commerce of Texas. In short, this population truly does have a presence in the state of Texas. It does deserve this recognition.

Friday, September 27, 2013, the designated day, is devoted to education. School districts with Title VII American Indian Education Programs will be assisted with appropriate culturally relevant information.

Saturday, September 28, 2013 is the inaugural celebration, “ReBirth”. The cultural event will focus on Elders Presentation, Symphony of Drums, and Profile in History.

Acknowledgements
Southwest.Jewish.Congress

The Southwest Jewish Congress is dedicated to educating the public on Israel and the Middle East, celebrating community cultural and interfaith diversity and initiating programs of mutual interest and concern with the community.

Rep. Roberto R. Alonzo

Roberto R. Alonzo is a Democratic member of the Texas House of Representatives, representing the 104th District since 1993.

UTA

The UT Arlington Native American Student Association (NASA) promotes culturally relevant activities that foster a closer union, individual tribal traditions and custom. Much of the HB 174 was written on the UT Arlington campus.

Akin Gump

Akin Gump Strauss Hauer and Feld LLP, a leading global law firm, and their commitment to diversity, reached out to our AIHD committee.

Representative Roberto Alonzo, the author of HB 174, and Mr. Jesse Bernal, were most helpful
in the passage of the bill. Governor Rick Perry signed HB 174 into law on May 10, 2013.

Texas Legislature History

HB 174 became Law / 05/10/2013

On April 25,  the Texas Legislature passed House Bill 174 effectively creating American Indian Heritage Day in Texas and because it got at least a two-thirds vote in both houses it takes effect immediately. This is important because it is not often that the Great State of Texas recognizes the historic, cultural, and social contributions of Native Americans within its borders. This law designates one day (the last Friday in September) to be observed in Texas public schools and other places with appropriate ceremonies, activities, and programs to honor Native Americans in this state and to celebrate their traditional and contemporary culture. I think we can all appreciate that increased public awareness, particularly among new generations of Texans, of the history of Native Americans in Texas has implications for our profession as well.


Stage 1

Bill filed by Rep. Roberto Alonzo.
11/13/2012.

Stage 2

HB 174 reported out of House.
3/4/2013.

Stage 3

HB 174 passed the House.
4/3/2013.

Stage 4

HB 174 reported out of Senate.
4/23/2013.

Stage 5

HB 174 passed the Senate.
4/26/2013.

Stage 6

HB 174 signed by the Governor.
5/10/2013.

Stage 7

HB 174 becomes law.
Effective immediately.
5/10/2013.

83rd Legislature / 2013

Texas Bill Sponsor

A sponsor, in the United States Congress, is the first member of the House or Senate to be listed among the potentially numerous lawmakers who introduce a bill for consideration. Committees are occasionally identified as sponsors of legislation as well. A sponsor is also sometimes called a “primary sponsor.”

It should not be assumed that a bill’s sponsor actually drafted it. The bill may have been drafted by a staff member, by an interest group, or by others.In the Senate, multiple sponsorship of a bill is permitted.

In contrast to a sponsor, a “cosponsor” is a senator or representative who adds his or her name as a supporter to the sponsor’s bill. An “initial cosponsor” or “original cosponsor” is a senator or representative who was listed as a cosponsor at the time of a bill’s introduction, rather than added as a cosponsor later on. A cosponsor added later is known as an “additional cosponsor”. Some bills have hundreds of cosponsors.


Primary

Roberto Alonzo
Democrat
District 104

Primary

Senfronia Thompson
Democrat
District 141

Primary

Rafael Anchia
Democrat
District 103

Primary

James White
Republican
District 19

Primary

Poncho Nevárez
Democrat
District 74

Cosponsor

Lon Burnam
Democrat
District 90

cosponsor

Philip Cortez
Cosponsor
District 117

cosponsor

Jason Isaac
Republican
District 45

cosponsor

Joseph Moody
Democrat
District 78

cosponsor

Phil Stephenson
Republican
District 85

Cosponsor

Hubert Vo
Republican
District 149

Primary

Judith Zaffirini
Democrat
District 21

Cosponsor

John Whitmire
Democrat
District 15

Welcome to the 2014 American Indian Heritage Day in Texas
sac(red).heirlooms Celebration

American Heritage Day in Texas

sac(red).heirlooms / 2014 Celebration

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“Sacred Heirlooms”, treasurers passed from family to family, generation to generation, are not items to hold but to hold in the heart for American Indian tribes and citizens. Sacred Heirlooms is abstract because as a survival piece it shows our strength, pride and identity for the next generation. This is our resource for existence to teach our people.

Morning Session

Survivalists of Boarding Schools

Morning_Boarding_School_visual

The purpose of American Indian boarding schools was to remove American Indians from their home and cultures in order to change their identities and lifestyles to be like the “white man”. American Indian children were forced to think and act like the dominant white culture and were not allowed to practice their traditional ways. Not only were languages and beliefs changes, but appearances as well. Hair styles, clothing and even names and body languages were changed.

Noontime Session

Tribal Connections

TRIBAL CONNECTION will recognize the state and city officials, the tribal dignitaries and its delegation, the sponsors, local tribal organizations, local tribal royalties, and honoring of the Tribal Elder of the Year, Mr. V. K. Oxendine. Special recognition will be given to the Chickasaw Nation of Oklahoma for its major sponsorship of the celebration of the American Indian Heritage Day.

Afternoon Session

Sacredness of Tribal Songs

Morning_tribal_hymns_visual3

In addition to the sacredness, American Indian music has evolved to become “an essential expression of American Indian identity. This cultural education session is focusing on the songs and hymns of American Indians. After brief explanation of the importance of American Indian music playing a vital role in history and education, listen to the songs of the Native American Church, listen to the ceremonial songs of various tribes, and tribal hymns being sung in many tribal languages.

Social Platform Awareness

Honor: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

honor_headdress_visual

This education project is the American Indian Heritage Day of Texas Committee’s first step into the realm of “social issues.” The mission of ‘Honor: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow’ is to serve the greater Indigenous community as well as non-Indigenous community by providing an engaging and interactive educational tool and opportunity to be presented and used with the general public regarding misappropriation of Indigenous headdresses and to emphasize the traditional values and meanings of the many headdresses used by varying Indigenous groups with particular attention paid to the groups whose seats are in the state of Texas.

At our table/booth at the AIHD Celebration we will have images for guests to view to see from the past, as well as contemporary images, to show that headdresses their use, and their sacredness are not relegated to the past. We will have pamphlets, essays, and handouts for the public to take to continue the educational process. Also, we will have an actual physical headdress that belongs to one of our contributors who has earned the honor and right to wear and share information about the headdress from her tribe. We hope we have lots of visitors and are able to educate as much as possible.

The History & Demographics of Boarding Schools

Historical Conception & Implementation of Boarding Schools

Boarding_School_visual

THE first American Indian Boarding School was established in 1860 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. By 1879 using a model curriculum implemented by retired Army Colonel Richard Henry Pratt, the schools became “militarized”.  By 1879 these school had enrollments of 12,000 students, by 1973 enrollment of 60,000 students.

AT the boarding schools children were forbidden to speak their native languages, forced to shed familiar clothing for uniforms, cut their hair and subjected to harsh discipline for the least infraction of the rules.

THE daily activities for the children were strictly regimented to keep the children continuously occupied with vocational level education and training, work activities, Christian teachings, maintaining the school and its farms, and removing any vestiges of their former lives to the point that these children no longer spoke their native language.

Official Merchandise

Sac(red).Heirlooms

web_merch_AIHD_poster
web_merch_AIHD_blue_shirt
web_merch_AIHD_red_shirt
web_merch_AIHD_gray_shirt
AIHD / Awareness Campaign

title: nuance

quotes_web_gen
quotes_web_means
quotes_web_hatchet
quotes_web_peltier
AIHD / sacred.heirlooms

Sponsors

sponsor_logo_chickasaw_nation
sponsor_logo_lone_star
sponsor_logo_chickasaw_global
sponsor_logo_methodist_conf
sponsor_logo_bnsf
sponsor_logo_oimc
sponsor_logo_dart
sponsor_logo_potawatomi
sponsor_logo_trinity
sponsor_logo_tribal_center
sponsor_logo_memnosyne
sponsor_logo_redman
Location

Lone Star Park / Grand Prairie, Texas

_ Dallas, Texas. August 15, 2014. In observance of a special law to recognize the many historic, cultural, and social contribution the American Indian communities and leaders have made in Texas, the American Indian Heritage Day in Texas is hosting a culture educational program, September 27, 2014 at Lone Star Park, 1000 Lone Star Parkway, Grand Prairie, Texas, from 10 to 4. This event is free and open to the public.

Lone Star Park

American Indian Heritage Day in Texas

Core Committee

American Indian Heritage Day in Texas

2nd Annual Event Planning Committee

Michael Dewey
Constance Hargis
Annette Anderson
Darrell Blackbear
Jason Ortiz
Angel Frazier
Linda Pahchecka-Valdez
Kathy McDonald
Angela Young
Linda Durant
Kristy Willis
Angela Bozarth
Bob Whistler
Eli Hickman
Ernest Gonzales
Lydia Gonzales
Gary Foster
Nancy Smith
T. Craig Anderson
Virginia Deleon
Kevin Sorrels
Stephanie Lefthand
Tabitha Tan

American Indian Heritage Day in Texas

Elders Committee

Peggy S. Larney
Eve Williams
Curtis Williams
Cliff Queton
Rae Queton

 

This is a launching point for a comprehensive study of American Indian’s history on modern culture.

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Looking Forward to the Future / Welcome to the Next!
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